Example Usages for Categories

The concept of Categories is one of the more powerful (and flexible!) aspects of SLP Scheduler's engine.  It can be used to achieve all kinds of schedule customizations.

Following are a few examples of how you might utilize Categories in your caseload.  Each example assumes that you're using "Topic #1", but it could also be entered as "Topic #2".

Separating Students Based on Therapy Type

If you entered Session Goals for each student, you might see that sometimes the scheduling engine mixes some session goals together if it helps create a better schedule overall.  This is because Session Goals are a soft constraint.  Mixing certain session goals together may not be accaptable for your therapy plans.  Here's one way to separate students based on therapy type.

In the "Categories" section, define a new "Topic" in your caseload:

  • Topic:  "Therapy Type"
  • Categories:  "Fluency", "Language", "Everything else"

In the "Students" section:

  • For each student in your caseload, select a value for "Category under Topic #1", either "Fluency", "Language", or "Everything else".  Don't leave any students blank!

Following the above scheme will ensure that students from one therapy type are not mixed with students from other therapy types.

Splitting a Caseload with an Assistant/SLPA

If you're splitting your caseload with an assistant, you might wish to keep all of the complex cases for yourself.  Here's one way to accomplish that.

In the "Categories" section, define a new "Topic" in your caseload:

  • Topic:  "Therapy Complexity"
  • Categories:  "Simple", "Complex"

In the "Students" section:

  • For each student in your caseload, select a value for "Category under Topic #1", either "Simple" or "Complex".  Don't leave any students blank!

In the "Therapists" section:

  • Set a "Category under Topic #1" for yourself as [blank].  This tells the scheduler that you can handle both Simple and Complex cases.
  • Set a "Category under Topic #1" for your assistant as "Simple".  This tells the scheduler that your assistant should be limited to cases marked "Simple".

Following the above scheme will also ensure that students marked as "Simple" are not mixed with students marked as "Complex" (and vice versa).

Manually Assigning Students to a Therapist

If you're splitting your caseload with an assistant, you might wish to manually assign some students to a therapist. Here's one way to accomplish that (assuming therapist names of Melissa and Sarah).

In the "Categories" section, define a new "Topic" in your caseload:

  • Topic: "Therapist"
  • Categories: "Melissa", "Sarah"

In the "Students" section:

  • For each student in your caseload, select a value for "Category under Topic #1", either "Melissa" or "Sarah". Leave this field blank for any students that aren't being manually assigned.

In the "Therapists" section:

  • Set a "Category under Topic #1" for Melissa as "Melissa". This tells the scheduler that Melissa can handle students either with no assignment, or specifically assigned to "Melissa".
  • Set a "Category under Topic #1" for Sarah as "Sarah". This tells the scheduler that Sarah can handle students either with no assignment, or specifically assigned to "Sarah".

One of Two Therapists is Bilingual

If two therapists are servicing your caseload, and one of them is bilingual, you might wish to direct which students see which therapist.  Here's one way to accomplish that.

In the "Categories" section, define a new "Topic" in your caseload:

  • Topic:  "Primary Language"
  • Categories:  "English", "Spanish"

In the "Students" section:

  • For each student in your caseload, select a value for "Category under Topic #1", either "English" or "Spanish".  Don't leave any students blank!

In the "Therapists" section:

  • Set a "Category under Topic #1" for the bilingual therapist as [blank].  This tells the scheduler that she/he can handle students with either primary language.
  • Set a "Category under Topic #1" for the unilingual therapist as her/his speaking language.  This tells the scheduler that she/he should be limited to students sharing the therpaist's speaking language.

Following the above scheme will also ensure that students having a primary language of "English" are not mixed with students having a primary language of "Spanish" (and vice versa).

This article was helpful for 1 person. Is this article helpful for you?